Sound Cards

Introduction

For the first 5-6 years of the IBM PC and its compatibles, their audio output came from nothing more than a simple loudspeaker with a tone generator. For business, this was acceptable - even preferable, since a PC in an office environment really shouldn't be a distraction to others! Only when games started to become more mainstream did the PC get acceptable audio.

With the introduction of the Ad Lib sound card in 1987, the world of PCs would begin its period of growth in home entertainment. As with most successful ventures, it wasn't long before a flurry of competitors entered the stage for a piece of the action.

As well as Ad Lib, a number of other "formats" were supported by games to varying degrees. Some of these are:

  • IBM Music Feature Card
  • Tandy 1000
  • Covox Speech Thing / Disney Sound Source (DSS)
  • Windows Sound System
  • Gravis Ultrasound
  • MediaVision Pro Audio Spectrum
  • Roland MT-32 / LAPC-I
  • General MIDI

It would be easy to state that Creative Labs cornered the market in the DOS gaming era, but that would be unfair to focus solely on the utter maelstrom of sound cards produced by them, as other manufacturers over time often produced some arguably better sounding solutions.

There is a lot more to a sound card than just the main chips which affect audio quality, but when comparing sound cards there are three primary chips responsible for setting the baseline for a card's capabilities. They are:

  • the FM synthesizer chip
  • the audio codec chip
  • the DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter) chip

For a more detailed look at these chips, please read the FM Synthesizers, Codecs and DACs page.

Catching the Wave

If you're relatively new to understanding PC audio hardware from 1985 to 1995, this may help clear up some misconceptions. Broadly speaking, there are five categories of sound card hardware for the PC. These are:

1) An FM synthesis sound card with no digital sample playback capability, e.g. Ad Lib.
2) A sound card that supports both FM synthesis and basic digital sample playback, e.g. Sound Blaster.
3) A sound card that either has Wavetable samples onboard *or* has a header to allow an optional daughterboard to be connected.
4) A wavetable daughterboard - not a sound card in its own right, these are modules that supplement a sound card, providing it with wavetable samples.
5) A MIDI synthesizer (either on a card or an external device) - if on an external device these relied on being connected to an interface or a sound card's MIDI/Game port to receive details of what to decode and playback.

Sound Cards Listed

This is quite a large page and some links take you to other pages. Use this Contents area to quickly navigate to a section or page:

Ad Lib Creative Sound Blaster / Pro
ATI Creative Sound Blaster 16
Avance Logic Creative Sound Blaster 32 / AWE32 / AWE64
Aztech Creative Sound Blaster AWE64
Covox / Disney Creative Sound Blaster ViBRA 16
Diamond  
Ensoniq Wavetable Daughterboards
ESS  
ExpertColor  
Gravis  
IBM  
Media Magic  
MediaTrix  
MediaVision  
Microsoft  
Miro  
Oak Technology  
OPTi  
Orchid
Roland  
Terratec  
Yamaha  

 

IBM Music Feature Card

Launched in March 1987 towards the end of its original PC line of PC/XT and AT, this was a collaboration between IBM and Yamaha. Essentially the Music Feature Card was a Yamaha FB-01 MIDI synthesizer installed on an 8-bit expansion card in much the same way as Roland put the MT-32 onto a card and called it the LAPC-I. The Music Feature Card therefore got all of the FB-01's properties: 8 FM voices controllable via 4 frequency operators. It came with over 300 high-quality synthesized instruments on-board, and it was actually possible to have two Music Feature Cards in a single PC to get 16 voices!

What's interesting is that this was the very first general purpose "sound card" for the PC, beating Ad Lib by several months. Unfortunately it was very expensive as most IBM products were back then, and its audience was primarily business users.

One good feature of the card was that it could interpret MIDI data without any further programming in software and send it to the on-board FM chip. Its MIDI interface, however, is *not* MPU-401-compatible. The card only found support by Sierra On-Line with support included in the following titles: Codename Iceman, The Colonel's Bequest, Conquests of Camelot, Hero's Quest, Hoyles Book of Games 1, Leisure Suit Larry 2 and 3, Mixed-Up Mother Goose, Police Quest 2, King's Quest 1 (VGA remake), Silpheed, Sorcerian, and Space Quest III.

The Music Feature Card will work in any PC-compatible if it will fit - it requires a full-length expansion slot.

Titles that directly supported the 4-operator FM synthesis found in the IBM Music Feature Card were:

  • 1988 Christmas Card (Sierra SCI0 demo)
  • Jones in the Fast Lane (patch)
  • King's Quest IV (early version only)
  • King's Quest V (patch only)
  • Leisure Suit Larry 2 (early version only)
  • Music Construction Set (special version)
  • Quest for Glory 2 (patch only)
  • Thexder 2 (patch only)

The following titles also work with the IBM MFC, but also require a Yamaha FB-01 MIDI module and MPU-401 interface:

  • Codename: Iceman
  • Colonel's Bequest, The
  • Conquests of Camelot (patch only)
  • Hero's Quest/Quest for Glory
  • Hoyle's Official Book of Games Volume I
  • Jones in the Fast Lane
  • King's Quest I SCI
  • King's Quest IV (later versions)
  • King's Quest V
  • Leisure Suit Larry 2 (later versions)
  • Leisure Suit Larry 3
  • Mixed Up Mother Goose (16-color SCI version, patch only)
  • Police Quest II
  • Quest for Glory 2
  • Silpheed
  • Sorcerian
  • Space Quest III

 

 

Wavetable Daughterboards

Wavetable daughterboards connect to your sound card and use digital recordings of real instruments and sound effects instead of imitations of those sounds that an FM chip produces. For example, when you hear a trumpet being played from a wavetable sound card (or more specifically, the wavetable daughterboard that's plugged into your sound card), you're actually hearing the sound of an actual trumpet!

So, broadly speaking, having a wavetable daughterboard connected to your sound card's wavetable header is equivalent to having an external General MIDI module, such as the Roland Sound Canvas series, or Yamaha MU-80.

The early wavetable cards/daughterboards came with a 1 MB ROM which stored the sounds of real instruments (called "samples"). With the arrival of the PCI bus for sound cards in addition to cheaper and larger amounts of RAM on typical PCs, most sound cards and integrated audio devices adopted a "soft wavetable" approach which meant loading 2MB to 8MB of samples into RAM without the need for a dedicated ROM chip on a daughterboard.

Daughterboard cards plug into an existing sound card that has a compatible wavetable 'header' (connector) such as Creative's Wave Blaster daughterboard that plugs into a Sound Blaster sound card, to provide the sound card with sample-based synthesis. This uses the MPU-401 UART interface on the sound card to send the sample-based sounds to the application or game (just like plugging an external MIDI module in would do). In most cases these were designed to work only from within a Windows MS-DOS window, so initially you would need to tell Windows that you want it to redirect MIDI from the Game/MIDI port to the wavetable daughterboard. You would then typically choose 'General MIDI' in the game's setup for this to work. In some cases, though, such as the MediaTrix Audiotrix Pro software, a DOS utility called SETMPU allows you to redirect audio-in and audio-out either to the onboard wavetable chip or to the device connected to the MPU-401 interface (the game port).

Several wavetable daughterboards were launched from various manufacturers, including Creative, Yamaha, Diamond, Turtle Beach, NEC and more. Below I list out the most common of these:

 

Aztech Sound Galaxy WavePower

Price when New: $129

From Rich Heimlich back in 1995: "It's a decent Creative Wave Blaster clone but doesn't sound as good as one. Used to be the only other choice.  Thankfully that's long ago now.". He rated the music quality at a poor 3.5 out of 10.

 

 

Aztech Wavetide

The Wavetide uses the ICS WaveFront ICS2115V chipset. It contains a 2MB ROM and supports 32-voice polyphony. It will only connect to an Aztech board's 50-pin expansion connector (in additional to the wavetable header) - it won't work on a standard Wave Blaster header.

 

 

Creative Wave Blaster (CT1900)

Price when New: $159
The CT1900 used an OKI E-MU Revision A chip. It has a 4MB ROM and supports 32-voice polyphony.

From Rich Heimlich: "We owe this product for getting us the Wave Blaster connector. But even given that, this is just an average choice for add-on products. Not bad, but you can do better both in price and sound quality.".

 

Creative Wave Blaster II (CT1910)

Price when New: $160
The CT1910 made use of the new EMU8000 chipset, and contained a 2MB ROM, and provides 32-voice polyphony.

Rich Heimlich said this of the WaveBlaster II: "A much better daughterboard than the original Wave Blaster including
a better patch set and effects processor.  You're likely to be very satisfied with one. On the downside, the sounds are a bit harsh, the effects are turned up more than usual to hide some flaws and the more esoteric instruments aren't very good.
". He scored its music quality at a respectable 7 out of 10.

Wave Blaster floppy disks (rev 2, 3, and WB II disk)

 

Diamond Monster Sound Wavetable

Comes in both 2MB and 4MB ROM size flavours, with the 2MB version supporting 32-voice polyphony and the 4MB version supporting 64-voice polyphony.

The 2MB version uses an AdMos QDSP QA1000 chip.
The 4MB version uses a Dream SAM9733 chip.
Card also known as AdWave32.

 

Ensoniq Soundscape DB

Price when New: $90

A 'wavetable' daughterboard (sample-based synthesis daughterboard) upgrade for PCs with a sound card bearing a Wave Blaster-compatible connector. It was based upon the S-2000 chipset but was without the digital sound effects section or any DAC. The SSDB would use the host sound card for final output. There are 2 flavours of this daughterboard: Revision A has a 2MB ROM chip. Revision B has a 1MB ROM chip.

From Rich Heimlich: "People will ask why they would want a 1MB patch set instead of a 2MB set.  Size isn't everything.  The 1MB set on this DB is the best 1MB set you're going to find.  It ends up rating about the same as the 2MB set but features more Sound Canvas-like patch volumes unlike their original Soundscape 2MB set.". He rated the music quality at 7.0 out of 10.

For the 2MB version, Ensoniq originally shipped this daughterboard with the same 2MB patch set found on their original Soundscape because the 1MB set it claimed to use wasn't done.  Early releases had hanging note problems but these were returnable for a newer, corrected unit.

 

MediaVision Pro Wave

KORG AI2 chip, 4 MB

 

 

NEC XR385

A clone of the Yamaha DB50XG. Uses the Yamaha XQ036A0 chipset. Contains a 4MB ROM and supports 32-voice polyphony. It supports the General MIDI standard plus the Yamaha XG extensions.

Arguably the best wavetable card you can buy (the Yamaha may have a little more street cred or cachet, but they are identical in terms of audio output).

 

 

Roland Sound Canvas SCB-7

4 MB

 

 

Terratec Wave XTable

Dream SAM9708 chip. Has a whopping 16MB ROM chip and supports 128-voice polyphony. It is fully General MIDI compliant and also supports the Yamaha XG extensions.

 

 

 

Turtle Beach Kurzweil HOMAC

Rockwell/Kurzweil RWA030/035 chip, 2 MB ROM (4 MB compressed using Kurzweil's proprietary compression), 32-voice polyphony. General MIDI compliant.

 

 

 

 

Turtle Beach Rio

Price when New: $140
Uses the ICS Wavefront ICS2115V chipset. Has a 4 MB ROM plus a socket for a SIPP RAM module to extend its capacity. 32-voice polyphony. Fully General MIDI compliant.

Much better sound than the Wave Blaster at a better price. RAM sampling and limited effects are a bonus but the RAM sampling is painfully slow due to the WB (Wave Blaster) interface which is why no other DB's offer this feature.  The Rio is used on the Monterey so it can be hard to find.

 

Yamaha DB50XG

Uses the Yamaha XQ036A0 chipset.
The XG is for "eXtended General MIDI", similar in purpose to Roland's GS standard. These cards have a 4MB ROM chip for sample storage, and offer 32-voice polyphony. Fully GM and XG compliant.

Works well with Sound Blaster cards that have a Wave Blaster header, as long as you don't use it together with digital sound effects.

As mentioned, about the best-quality daughterboard you can find.

Serdashop Dreamblaster S1

A modern-day (2019) wavetable synthesizer module for use with any Wave Blaster-compatible sound card, e.g. SoundBlaster 16, Audician 32, ESS AudioDrive, Aureal Vortex 2 and many others. Based on the SAM2195 chip. If you don't have a wavetable connector on your sound card, you can still use the S1 with the addition of the CHiLL and Phil Adapter which allows you to connect the S1 to your sound card's MPU401-compatible Game/MIDI port.

Succeeded by the Dreamblaster S2.

  • 64-voice polyphony (without effects)
  • 38-voice polyphony + effects
  • High quality, compact size
  • CleanWave soundset
  • General MIDI compatible effects
  • 4-band stereo equalizer
  • Low power consumption, only 5V supply required (no +/- 12V)
  • Low noise audio output
  • Can be used on Waveblaster Compatible soundcards
  • Can be used for electronics projects, such as arduino, raspberry pi, midibox,...
  • Small size, ideal for building into projects : 36mm x 35mm

Serdashop Dreamblaster S2

A modern-day Waveblaster-compatible synth module based on the SAM2695 chip (datasheet here). Available to buy new in 2019!
Excellent for gaming, music production, sound experiments,..
Combines wavetable and FM synth sound for a high end retro sound.

If you don't have a wavetable connector on your sound card, you can still use the S2 with the addition of the CHiLL and Phil Adapter which allows you to connect the S2 to your sound card's MPU401-compatible Game/MIDI port.

  • 64-voice polyphony (without effects)
  • 38-voice polyphony + effects
  • High quality, compact size
  • CleanWave soundset
  • General MIDI compatible effects
  • 4-band stereo equalizer
  • Low power consumption, only 5V supply required (no +/- 12V)
  • Low noise audio output
  • Can be used on Waveblaster compatible soundcards
  • Can be used for electronics projects, such as arduino, raspberry pi, midibox,...
  • Very small size, ideal for building into projects : 24mm x 34mm
This board is intended for testing, education, development, and usage in custom projects and prototypes.
Cheap but brilliant replacement for the more and more becoming less available GM-daughterboards like famous Roland SCB-7 or Yamaha DB50XG.

Compatible with any soundcard that has a Waveblaster connector : SoundBlaster 16, Audician 32, ESS AudioDrive, Aureal Vortex 2 and many others.
Please note: There are some older soundcards with a Waveblaster compatible header but don‘t have an MPU401 interface. Instead there is only the SoundBlaster MIDI standard supported so the games that run with the S2 module are limited. You can use SoftMPU to emulate the MPU401 interface in this case. Visit http://bjt42.github.io/softmpu/ for further information and a list of compatible games.

 

Serdashop Dreamblaster X2

The X2 takes the modern-day Dreamblaster S2 to another level. Available to buy new in 2019!

Small form factor midi PCB : 65mm x 38mm size
- Black color PCB
- Dream 5000 series synth chip with 81 voices polyphony, high quality effects engine
- Waveblaster-compatible connector for use on soundcards (such as Soundblaster 16, Audician 32, ESS AudioDrive, Aureal Vortex 2 and many others...) and DIY projects.
- It will also work on instruments that accept waveblaster cards, such as Oberheim MC2000, Korg NS5R and Terratex Axon AX 100
- Super low latency <1ms
- 64mbyte flash for soundbank data
- USB MIDI in (Class compliant midi device, works on windows XP and higher, without drivers)
- stereo line out using a high quality 24 bit DAC    
- Preloaded with a high quality 16 megabyte Dream General MIDI soundbank 
- Advanced MIDI commands spec available.
- DreamBlaster preset editor / USB uploader tool for advanced customization/tweaking.

If you don't have a wavetable connector on your sound card, you can still use the X2 with the addition of the CHiLL and Phil Adapter which allows you to connect the X2 to your sound card's MPU401-compatible Game/MIDI port.

 

 

 

Sound Blaster ViBRA16

The ViBRA range was a cheap Sound Blaster 16 alternative for OEMs. The CT2504 retained the Yamaha OPL3 chip for FM music synthesis, but later (and more common) cards got the inferior CQM (Creative Quadratic Modulation) which was developed by E-Mu Systems. This included the CT2501 (ViBRA 16), CT2504 (ViBRA 16S), CT2505 (ViBRA 16C PnP), and CT2511 (ViBRA 16XV). The only advantage [for some] of the ViBRA range was the inclusion of a modem on-board. Otherwise, for DOS purposes, these cards are to be avoided.

CT2260

Introduced in 1994.
FM Synthesizer: Yamaha YMF262.
The CT2501 is the ViBRA 16 chip (Integrated Bus Controller Interface, the DSP, the Mixer and the Codec).

CT2260 driver (same as for CT4180), ViBRA 16 Floppy Disks

CT2890

Introduced in 1995.
FM Synthesizer: Yamaha YMF262.
MIDI synthesizer: CT2504 - ViBRA 16S
The CT2504 is more commonly found on SB16s integrated on the motherboard. 80 dB SnR.
IDE interface.

The CT1705 chip is the Plug-and-Play bus interface.

CT4180

Introduced in 1997.
MIDI synthesizer: CT2505 - VIBRA 16C.
Tends to be found on SB16s integrated on the motherboard. Integrated CT-1978 (CQM chip that emulates the OPL3).

 

 

ATI

Stereo F/X

Introduced: 1992.
FM synthesizer chip: Yamaha YM3812 (OPL2)
Sound Blaster Pro, Ad Lib, and Windows Sound System compatible.
General MIDI support in DOS.
Wavetable connector (only works in Windows 3.1, not DOS).

The mid-sized SC chip is an 8-bit microcontroller.

ATI Stereo F/X drivers

 

Stereo F/X-CD

Introduced: 1993.
FM synthesizer chip: Yamaha YMF262-M (OPL3)
Ad Lib, Sound Blaster Pro and Windows Sound System compatible.
General MIDI support in DOS.
Wavetable connector (only works in Windows 3.1, not DOS).
40-pin Mitsumi CD-ROM interface.

The Stereo F/X-CD has no jumpers - it's configured entirely via software. It came bundled with a cable for re-routing the PC speaker through the Stereo F/X card. The two provided 5.25" floppy disks included Universal DOS and Windows drivers, plus a few other useful tools including a mixer. These include WinDAT and DOSDat - written by Voyetra Technologies, they provide an interface similar to the controls on a stereo system or high-end tape deck.

 

 

Microsoft

In 1992 Microsoft developed the Windows Sound System, which was a specification for Windows 3.1 audio. It featured support for 16-bit 48 kHz digital sampling, which was better than the Sound Blaster Pro, and also analogue outputs. The first set of drivers were released in February 1993, and supported Ad Lib and Sound Blaster emulation, plus support for DOS-based games. In October of the same year, version 2.0 of the specification extended it to support OEM versions of cards from Media Vision, Creative Labs, and ESS Technology. The new DOS driver extended emulation to Sound Blaster 16, but did not have support for FM synthesis or wavetables.

From Windows 95 onwards, the drivers for WSS were built-in. For DOS there are no drivers needed for games that natively support WSS, but you will need drivers for Sound Blaster emulation in DOS. You can download these here. There are also original copies of the three Windows driver disks for WSS v1.02 here. The first disk is the main Setup disk for Window. Disk 2 is Proof Reader, and Di

 

ExpertColor

Device Image PnP Comments Drivers
MED3139        
MED3201        
MED3700  

Yamaha OPL3-SAx chip.
FCC ID: LUT-MED3700

Released in 1997.

 
MED3931  

16-bit ISA. OPTi 82C931 chip.

Released in 1996.

 
MED6617        

 

Miro Computer Products AG

miroSOUND PCM 1 Pro

Introduced in 1994.
FM synthesizer: Yamaha YMF278B-F (OPL4).
Audio codec: Crystal CS4231-KL.
Chipset: OPTi 82C929A (MAD16 Pro).
DAC: Yamaha YAC516-E.
IDE, Sony, Panasonic and Mitsumi CD-ROM headers.

The Yamaha YRW801 chip in the bottom left is a 2MB ROM which holds approximately 330 samples, mostly 22.05-kHz 12-bit samples with some drums at 44.1 kHz. It is compatible with the General MIDI standard (128 melody sounds, 47 percussion sounds).

 

miroSOUND FM 10

Introduced in 1995.
Chipset: OPTi 82C929A (MAD16 Pro).
Compatibility: AdLib, Sound Blaster, Sound Blaster Pro II, Microsoft Windows Sound System, Roland MPU-401 (Windows).
IDE, Sony, Panasonic and Mitsumi CD-ROM headers.

Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, User Manual (German)

 

miroSOUND PCM 10

Introduced in 1995.
FM synthesizer: Yamaha YMF278B-F (OPL4).
Chipset: OPTi 82C929A (MAD16 Pro).
Built-in wavetable synthesizer based on Yamaha OPL4 chip and 2MB ROM sound set.
Roland MPU-401 UART compatible (Windows only)
IDE, Sony, Panasonic and Mitsumi CD-ROM headers.

The Yamaha YRW801 chip in the bottom left is a 2MB ROM which holds approximately 330 samples, mostly 22.05-kHz 12-bit samples with some drums at 44.1 kHz. It is compatible with the General MIDI standard (128 melody sounds, 47 percussion sounds).

Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, User Manual

 

miroSOUND PCM 12

Introduced in 1995.
Chipset: OPTi 82C924. Earlier revisions had a 82C929A (MAD16 Pro).
Audio codec: Analog Devices AD1848 (Earlier revisions had a Crystal CS4231A).
Compatibility: AdLib, Sound Blaster, Sound Blaster Pro II, Microsoft Windows Sound System 2.0, Roland MPU-401 (Windows and DOS).
1995 version is non-PnP. A later PnP version was released in 1996.
FCC ID: LAHSPCM12-ISA-1

Built-in wavetable synthesizer based on Yamaha OPL4 chip and 2MB ROM sound set.
Wavetable daughterboard connector connects to the MPU-401 UART port on the OPTi chip.
Revision E of this card also gets an IDE connector for CD-ROM drives. Older revisions got 3 older CD-ROM connectors for Mitsumi, Panasonic and Sony.
Initialisation and mixer settings must be made by running SNDINDOS.EXE.

The Yamaha YRW801 chip in the bottom left is a 2MB ROM which holds approximately 330 samples, mostly 22.05-kHz 12-bit samples with some drums at 44.1 kHz. It is compatible with the General MIDI standard (128 melody sounds, 47 percussion sounds).

Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, User Manual

 

MiroSOUND PCM 20

Introduced in 1996.
Chipset: OPTi 82C924.

PnP.
Compatibility: AdLib, Sound Blaster, Sound Blaster Pro II, Microsoft Windows Sound System, Roland MPU-401 (Windows and DOS).

Built-in wavetable synthesizer based on Yamaha OPL4 chip and 2MB ROM sound set.
Similar to PCM 12, but includes a built-in radio tuner.

The OPTi chipset manages direct MIDI playback over the MPU-401 interface. Yamaha’s own SW20-PC provided a software driver for DOS enabling MPU-401 playback.

Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, User Manual

 

Yamaha

Audician 32 Plus (A151-A00) (1997)

FM synthesizer: Yamaha YM719E-S (OPL3).
Sound Blaster, Sound Blaster Pro 2.0 and Windows Sound System compatible.
MPU-401 UART via game port.
Wavetable header.
FCC ID: LWHA151A00

This same card was manufactured by different companies including Addonics, Labway, Genius and Aopen, although the Yamaha card got the CD-ROM header and few extras over this. It's apparently quite a loud (volume, not signal noise!) card even after reducing the volume via "mixerset.exe". Wavetable output can exhibit clipping even after reducing the volume to the lowest settings. Compared to SB Pro 2 or Terratec 16/96, the output of this card is much clearer.

All you need is SETUPSA.EXE. This initializes any Yamaha SAx chip (701, 704, 715, 718, 719) in DOS. One thing you may notice is that when running in Sound Blaster 2.0 mode, the left and right audio channels appear to be reversed. Some games have an option to flip the audio.

Another option for configuring this card is to use the driver software from the MediaTrix 3D-XG, as this is excellent, and works with any YMF-71x-based sound card.

In some cases, the OPL works fine in every game, but the PCM audio is buggy (gets cut off, crashes the game, or most often, won't play at all) in most games, with the exceptions being Descent and Quake from the games I've tried, which work fine.

If using "Line-in", it will only work if setupsa /s is run first.

Terminal Velocity reacts the worst to my card, hanging the entire system after playing a test sound once that is supposed to be played twice. If you're using DMA channel 0 then try changing it to DMA channel 1 or 3 - some newer boards such as this do not always play along with DMA0 on the YMF71x chips. Locking out DMA 0 by assigning it to "Legacy ISA" in the BIOS makes things work a bit better, though Doom will not play sound if General MIDI is enabled.

On the Yamaha Audician driver disk is the drivers for DOS, Windows 3.1, 95, and 98. When you install these for Windows, it automatically installs the DOS drivers as well. On the contained CD there is also a separate DOS installer under the DOS folder, where you can run install.exe which will configure your config.sys and autoexec.bat files for you.

 

All in all, this is a fantastic card for DOS gaming - it produces very clean sound, has no hanging note bugs, works great in DOS and Windows (where it has a Soft Midi synth mode!) and works with most DOS games. Compared to a lot of cards from Creative which tend to be noisy (electrical inteference-wise), this card is very quiet (again, electrical noise-wise).

 

Audio Wave

FM synthesizer: Yamaha YM718-S (OPL3).
Wavetable header.

 

Sound Edge

FM synthesizer: Yamaha YMF278B (OPL4).
Chipset: OPTi 82C928 (MAD16).
Audio codec: Analog Devices AD1848KP.

Sony, Mitsumi and Panasonic CD-ROM interfaces.